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Andrew Morris

French to English translator, Translation Mastermind founder, ProZ.com staff.
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Translation Postcards: Raffaella Prati in Ría de Arousa, Spain

September 20, 2021 / by Andrew Morris posted in freelancer, translator, translation postcards

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Throughout history, the general direction of migration within countries has been from the rural areas to the city. The imperatives of escaping labour on the land or seeking work and a regular wage have driven millions to pack their meagre bags and set out for their national or regional capitals.

 

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Global Voices 5: Yalda Hamidi, an Afghan interpreter now living in Ecuador

September 13, 2021 / by Andrew Morris posted in interpreter, ProZ.com Interpreter Network, interpreting, Global Voices

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There are many within the translation and interpreting community who live far from the land where they were born. We pack our bags without too much difficulty, learn new languages, assimilate new cultures, make new friends. But even among such a well-travelled and cosmopolitan community, some stories stand out as unusual, and that of Yalda Hamidi, an Afghan interpreter now living in Ecuador, is remarkable.

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Using the BlueBoard to get clients

August 31, 2021 / by Andrew Morris posted in freelancer, jobs, ProZ.com, facebook, Blue Board

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Earlier I hinted at a more effective way (at least in my experience) to get clients via ProZ than either responding to ads or polishing your profile to a high shine – important though these are.



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Translation Postcards: Pritha Bhatnagar in New Delhi, India

August 30, 2021 / by Andrew Morris posted in freelancer, translator, translation postcards

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There are few cities more tumultuous – and full of contrasts – than India’s capital New Delhi. From the teeming streets and markets to the soaring architecture, from the manicured lawns of the luxury hotels and upper-class districts to the overcrowded markets, from the street eateries to the dazzling array of fine-dining restaurants, and from the twisting and choked narrow streets to impressive boulevards, all set against the cacophonous background of permanent traffic jams, shouts in a dozen Indian languages, and year-round searing heat, while the aroma of curry leaves, pomegranate flowers and roses hovers in the air. The centre for many ruling dynasties down the centuries, Delhi is a palimpsest where history and legacy have left their marks wherever you look. A city of extremes, where the one guarantee is that you’ll never be bored.

 

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Translation Postcards: Keith Baddeley in Frigiliana, Spain

July 26, 2021 / by Andrew Morris posted in freelancer, translator, translation postcards

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Many of us are used to the sounds of city life from the moment we wake up. The cars revving, the trundle of the city cleaners, the distant siren and the dog barking. Not to mention the all-night amber haze of streetlamps, the low cloud of light pollution obscuring the stars, and the lingering smell of petrol fumes…

 

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Translation Postcards: Elżbieta Dubois in Courseulles-sur-Mer, France

July 5, 2021 / by Andrew Morris posted in freelancer, translator, translation postcards

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Who needs an alarm clock when you have screeching seagulls to do the job? Especially in summer, when the influx of food-bearing tourists attracts flocks in search of tasty tidbits. But your auditory senses are not the only ones assailed in the little seaside town of Courseulles-sur-Mer in Normandy, northwestern France. When the tide is low, the air is rich with the smell of fish, seafood, weeds and salt, flooding in the moment you open the window…

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Global Voices 4: Bimal Man Shrestha in Canada

June 28, 2021 / by Andrew Morris posted in interpreter, ProZ.com Interpreter Network, interpreting, Global Voices

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It’s hard to picture two more different places than the Kathmandu Valley and suburban Toronto, but such extreme contrasts form a natural part of the narrative of Bimal Man Shrestha’s life.

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Translation Postcards: Bruna Bonatto in Santiago, Chile

June 14, 2021 / by Andrew Morris posted in freelancer, translator, translation postcards

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It’s 480 years old and is one of the largest cities in the Americas. Santiago de Chile (St James of Chile), to give it its full name, was founded in 1541 by the Spanish conquistador Pedro de Valdivia, and has been the capital since colonial times. With a downtown core of 19th-century neoclassical architecture and winding side-streets, dotted by art deco, neo-gothic, and other styles. Santiago's cityscape is shaped by several stand-alone hills and also the soaring, if unimaginatively named, Gran Torre Santiago, the tallest skyscraper in Latin America.

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Changing Places 4: Susan Ring, from Dublin to Berlin

May 24, 2021 / by Andrew Morris posted in freelancer, translator, ProZ.com, changing places

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What do you do when you’re a rebellious tomboy growing up in a conservative country dominated by the Catholic Church, with education run mostly by nuns and priests, 25% unemployment, the shadow of the Troubles looming further to the North, and a national tradition for exporting its people?

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Language Watch 13: Thanks to Translation Commons team

May 14, 2021 / by Andrew Morris posted in translation, language industry, translation history, language digitisation initiative, indigenous languages, translation commons

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Just a short word of thanks today to the team from Translation Commons who helped me enormously with the research for the 12-part “Language Watch” series.*

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Translation Postcards: Voula Pantsidou in Athens, Greece

May 10, 2021 / by Andrew Morris posted in freelancer, translator, translation postcards

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As we’ve seen throughout our series of Translation Postcards, you can find translators in historic villages, towns and cities all over the world, but few of us live in a place that boasts over 3,400 years of recorded history.  Home to Plato’s Academy and Aristotle’s Lyceum, Athens (Αθήνα) is widely referred to as the cradle of Western civilisation and the birthplace of democracy, largely because of its cultural and political impact on the European continent, and in particular the Romans.

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Changing Places 3: Mahdi Abdulbasit from Ethiopia to Egypt

May 3, 2021 / by Andrew Morris posted in freelancer, translator, ProZ.com, changing places

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Many are the reasons we change countries in the course of our lives. For the majority of us, those reasons are innocuous enough – we are drawn to different cultures, or climates, or lured by romance. And yet such life choices are sometimes far harder, as we’ll see in the case of translator and interpreter Mahdi Abdulbasit, who fled Ethiopia for Egypt in 2016.

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Language Watch 12: Romani

April 30, 2021 / by Andrew Morris posted in translation, language industry, translation history, language digitisation initiative, indigenous languages, translation commons

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Persecution: enslavement, forced assimilation, segregation, genocide perpetrated by Nazi Germany during World War II, and other human rights violations  – the history, both ancient and modern, of the Roma of East-Central and Eastern Europe and the Balkans, is a litany of suffering.

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Language Watch 11: Chipewyan in Canada

April 23, 2021 / by Andrew Morris posted in translation, language industry, translation history, language digitisation initiative, indigenous languages, translation commons

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In this week’s Language Watch, we head for the first time to Canada, and the indigenous peoples known collectively as the First Nations. We zoom in on the northern boreal and Arctic regions and on the Dene people, who speak a group of languages that are described as Northern Athabaskan.

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Translation Postcards: Suzie Withers in Southampton, UK

April 19, 2021 / by Andrew Morris posted in freelancer, translator, translation postcards

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It may not be a pretty city, but it’s certainly a historic one, with roots that date back to the pre-Viking, Anglo-Saxon era, and a port that was already a busy international transit hub when William the Conqueror was on the throne in the 11th century. Some of the ancient city walls are still visible – the most famous relic being the iconic Bargate.

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