ProZ.com Blog

7 questions from the first Video Game Localization Meetup answered

July 21, 2021 / by Rocío Tempone posted in freelancer, fun, networking, game localization, games, game localizers, events, ProZ.com, translation industry, language industry, audiovisual translation, meetups

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Last year, ProZ.com launched a new service called Meetups for members to engage in online networking during this new normal where networking in person became nearly impossible. 

This year,  ProZ.com teamed up with Terra Localizations to bring you a series of Meetups about game localization. Divided in six levels, the first one —open to members and non-members took place on June 24.

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ProZ.com 101: a glimpse of the translation workplace

June 22, 2021 / by Lucía Leszinsky posted in freelancer, language jobs, freelancer, translator, jobs, payments, networking, translation, ProZ.com, community, language industry, rates, direct clients

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Are you new to the translation industry? Would you like to work as a translator, but you are unsure about how to get started? Do you have questions about ProZ.com, the platform, the community, the tools available? Then this post is for you. Just keep the following in mind, and you'll find your way in the ProZ.com translation workplace in no time:

 

« ProZ.com is different than what you may be expecting »

 

The following questions and answers will show you why.


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Language Watch 13: Thanks to Translation Commons team

May 14, 2021 / by Andrew Morris posted in translation, language industry, translation history, language digitisation initiative, indigenous languages, translation commons

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Just a short word of thanks today to the team from Translation Commons who helped me enormously with the research for the 12-part “Language Watch” series.*

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Language Watch 12: Romani

April 30, 2021 / by Andrew Morris posted in translation, language industry, translation history, language digitisation initiative, indigenous languages, translation commons

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Persecution: enslavement, forced assimilation, segregation, genocide perpetrated by Nazi Germany during World War II, and other human rights violations  – the history, both ancient and modern, of the Roma of East-Central and Eastern Europe and the Balkans, is a litany of suffering.

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Language Watch 11: Chipewyan in Canada

April 23, 2021 / by Andrew Morris posted in translation, language industry, translation history, language digitisation initiative, indigenous languages, translation commons

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In this week’s Language Watch, we head for the first time to Canada, and the indigenous peoples known collectively as the First Nations. We zoom in on the northern boreal and Arctic regions and on the Dene people, who speak a group of languages that are described as Northern Athabaskan.

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Guest post: Translated presents 'Lara', a short film about the wonder of language

April 21, 2021 / by Rocío Tempone posted in translation industry, community, language industry, guest post

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Translating means allowing everyone to understand the world and to be understood. A real gift that people working into the localization industry offer every day to everyone who needs to communicate or understand a message in another language.

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Language Watch 10: FinSSL, DSL and APSL Sign Languages

April 16, 2021 / by Andrew Morris posted in translation, language industry, translation history, language digitisation initiative, indigenous languages, translation commons

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The world’s deaf communities have long suffered from discrimination. Aristotle himself deemed the deaf unteachable, paving the way for centuries of prejudice. It was not until the 16th century that Italian physician Girolamo Cardano proclaimed that the deaf-mute people could “hear by reading and speak by writing”.

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Language Watch 9: Yolŋu Matha, Australia

April 9, 2021 / by Andrew Morris posted in translation, language industry, translation history, language digitisation initiative, indigenous languages, translation commons

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Take a look at the video below and within seconds you’ll realise where we’re headed in this week’s Language Watch. So far in our series, we’ve travelled to Asia, Africa, North and South America, and Europe, shining a spotlight each time on minority and endangered languages throughout the world. Now for the first time, we’re in Oceania, in Australia’s Northern Territory to be precise, and the world of the Yolŋu Aboriginal people.

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Language Watch 8: Mru in Bangladesh, Myanmar and India

April 2, 2021 / by Andrew Morris posted in translation, language industry, translation history, language digitisation initiative, indigenous languages, translation commons

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Some of the communities and languages we focus on in this series may be vaguely familiar to you. Many others are completely unknown in the wider world – and barely even recognised or understood in the countries in which they have lived for centuries. Such is the case of the Mru people of Bangladesh – one of the many tribes that populate the Chittagong Hill Tracts, an underdeveloped and heavily militarised region in the South-East of what is already a country facing momentous struggles of its own.

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Language Watch 7: Cherokee

March 26, 2021 / by Andrew Morris posted in translation, language industry, translation history, language digitisation initiative, indigenous languages, translation commons

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Cherokee, Sioux, Apache, Navaho… all names that trip off the tongue easily enough, just as the music in this video might ring familiar, but how much do we really know about the history, cultures and languages of the indigenous peoples in what are now the United States?


Very little in fact – most of our mental imagery is probably a product of Hollywood, and the very names of these great nations have been co-opted by car makers, songwriters and other avatars of popular culture.

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Language Watch 6: Kristang, Malaysia

March 19, 2021 / by Andrew Morris posted in translation, language industry, translation history, language digitisation initiative, indigenous languages, translation commons

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A quick glance at the first photo and you might think you were looking at a traditional dance in some Portuguese village. However, look more closely at the faces and you realise with a start that the scene is more likely taking place in Asia. Your initial confusion is understandable, because these are in fact Eurasians, and they belong to the Kristang community in Malaysia. See this video for a few examples of this fascinating language…


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Language Watch 5: Ainu, Japan

March 12, 2021 / by Andrew Morris posted in translation, language industry, translation history, language digitisation initiative, indigenous languages, translation commons

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If you’re an observer of the world stage and pride yourself on your internationalist outlook, you’re likely to be familiar with the history and struggles of Aboriginal Australians, Native Americans, or the First Nations of Canada. But chances are, you’re less aware of the history or languages of the indigenous peoples of Japan. In fact, each of Japan’s two main islands has its own people: Honshu to the South was originally inhabited by the Okinawans, while Hokkaido to the North was home to the Ainu, to whom this issue of Language Watch is dedicated.

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Language Watch 4: Nǁng, Kalahari Desert

March 5, 2021 / by Andrew Morris posted in translation, language industry, translation history, language digitisation initiative, indigenous languages, translation commons

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No, “Nǁng” is not a typo. Nor are its variants “N|uu" or “Nlu”. As you’ll see from the video it’s a way of capturing some of the unique clicking sounds in this endangered language, native to the Kalahari Desert.

 

 

In fact, there are just 4-5 speakers left, all aged 80-95, in the form of Hannah Koper and her sisters (the last male speaker passed away in 2013), plus a smattering who can recall isolated words.

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Language Watch 3: Juma, the Amazon

February 26, 2021 / by Andrew Morris posted in translation, language industry, translation history, language digitisation initiative, indigenous languages, translation commons

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Take a few minutes to look at the video and take in the sights and sounds of a way of life threatened by extinction. This is the Juma culture in Brazil’s Amazon region. The language, also known as Juma, is a dialect of Kagwahiva, a branch of the Tupii Guaraani family of Amazonian languages. Juma and its phonetics were studied by American missionaries Arne and Joyce Abrahamson, from the Summer Institute of Linguistics in the 1970s.

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Language Watch 2: Nanai

February 19, 2021 / by Andrew Morris posted in translation, language industry, translation history, language digitisation initiative, indigenous languages, translation commons

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Once again, begin by closing your eyes and listening to the haunting tones of this song.

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